Carolina Gallo, who goes by Caro, is a storyteller from Chicago Lawn with a passion for fiber arts. Caro pick up her first needle at the age of 6 when her abuelita taught her embroidery— starting with suns and flowers— from her hometown in Jalisco. 
"For The Brown Kids" is her first gallery. Come out to congratulate her on June 13 from 7-10pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island. 

Carolina Gallo, who goes by Caro, is a storyteller from Chicago Lawn with a passion for fiber arts. Caro pick up her first needle at the age of 6 when her abuelita taught her embroidery— starting with suns and flowers— from her hometown in Jalisco.

"For The Brown Kids" is her first gallery. Come out to congratulate her on June 13 from 7-10pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island. 

Jorge M Herrera was born in Durango, Mexico. When he was 7 years old, his family decided to emigrate to the far south side of Chicago. He is a practicing architect and received his Bachelor of Architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology. 
All his life, he has been doodling, sketching and drawing and recently took up painting.
Come check out his painting life on Friday, June 13, from 7 to 10 pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island at “For the Brown Kids.”

Jorge M Herrera was born in Durango, Mexico. When he was 7 years old, his family decided to emigrate to the far south side of Chicago. He is a practicing architect and received his Bachelor of Architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology.

All his life, he has been doodling, sketching and drawing and recently took up painting.

Come check out his painting life on Friday, June 13, from 7 to 10 pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island at “For the Brown Kids.”

Fatima Garcia, 20, was born and raised in a small town in California. She moved to Chicago in 2006. She knew she was good at creating art at an early age. Though she never thought of fully pursuing it.
However, after realizing the opportunities and potential for truly chasing her dream, she has confidently decided to try.
See her piece live at our "For The Brown Kids" event, June 13, from 7-10pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island.

Fatima Garcia, 20, was born and raised in a small town in California. She moved to Chicago in 2006. She knew she was good at creating art at an early age. Though she never thought of fully pursuing it.

However, after realizing the opportunities and potential for truly chasing her dream, she has confidently decided to try.

See her piece live at our "For The Brown Kids" event, June 13, from 7-10pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island.

Born and raised in Little Village, Jay Jasso absorbed the acute attention to historic Mexican leaders in the arts and political arena. This originated from humble beginnings as a street artist, through an abstract interpretation of patriotic admiration of these characters. 
Subsequently, he refined his own visual and conceptual view of hsi work that emerged through focusing on cultural identity and social awareness, love for pop art, and contemporary and abstract values. His work can be found through out Chicago’s streets and has also been exhibited at the Museum of Mexican Fine Arts in Chicago.
See his piece live at our "For The Brown Kids" event, June 13, from 7-10pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island.

Born and raised in Little Village, Jay Jasso absorbed the acute attention to historic Mexican leaders in the arts and political arena. This originated from humble beginnings as a street artist, through an abstract interpretation of patriotic admiration of these characters.

Subsequently, he refined his own visual and conceptual view of hsi work that emerged through focusing on cultural identity and social awareness, love for pop art, and contemporary and abstract values. His work can be found through out Chicago’s streets and has also been exhibited at the Museum of Mexican Fine Arts in Chicago.

See his piece live at our "For The Brown Kids" event, June 13, from 7-10pm at Blue|1647, 1647 South Blue Island.

For the Brown Kids participant: Max Herman

Max Herman’s documentary photography can be traced back to when he was a young teenager, taking pictures of the wildstyle graffiti he first spotted while riding the CTA Red Line.
Today Max still documents the ever-evolving graffiti and public art of Chicago or any city he visits with the belief that art in the street remains an essential expression and reflection of society. Recently Max photographed the The Art in Public Places campaign in the 25th Ward for Chicago Urban Art Society and Alderman Solis.
Beyond visual art, Max has been taking photos of music, entertainment, and cultural events since 2007 when he was still a music/arts journalist. Since transitioning to photojournalism professionally, Max has regularly covered small club performances and large music festivals alike for numerous publications.  
In the past couple years he has also expanded his reach covering news-leaning issues and events in Chicago with his photos appearing in publications like The National Journal and Vice. Max’s aim remains to document people  creating and doing what they believe in, whether that’s painting a wall, performing on stage or sparking a protest.